Change the world

It takes a village to raise a child, and our experience from the onset of the coronavirus pandemic has demonstrated that our “village ” has many actors, or stakeholders, willing to ensure that our children achieve holistic education outcomes in a system still characterised by glaring inequality, especially in socio-economically marginalised communities.

The Covid-19 pandemic has forced academics to reflect and reimagine teaching and learning.

Professor Lungile Pepeta passed away on August 7. He was just 46 years of age.

The rural village of Ludeke in the town of Mbizana in the Alfred Nzo region of our province, birthed, grew and honed a fine young man, who would not only make them proud, but also ceaselessly exemplify his roots — humble beginnings, reaffirm his identity and most importantly, connect and carry the aspirations of his people, particularly the youth. 

Has the Eastern Cape hit the peak of the Covid-19 pandemic? While this question is on the lips of many, the answer, at least for the Eastern Cape, is no.

Right now South Africa needs to start reimagining our schools as places of hope and opportunity, not only for our children but for the residents of the area in which they are situated.

I write this reflection on those “Six Days in August” (the title of a DVD by Mikale Barry), the Northern Areas uprising in 1990, with a visceral memory of that tumultuous time in our history.

A shortage of nurses and doctors, coupled with the health sector's failure to have a coordinated response in the Eastern Cape, has ensured a tsunami wave is on its way, the dean of the Department of Health Sciences at the Nelson Mandela University, Professor Lungile Pepeta, has told News24. 

Hospitals in Nelson Mandela Bay were implementing emergency plans on Monday as the number of coronavirus cases in the metro neared 5,000 and was expected to double in the next 10 days.

Some schools, predominantly the better-resourced schools, have been able to carry on with teaching online whereas in many other schools, learners have had to make do with a couple of radio and television lessons.

Who would have thought that internal marketing would pay off at a time like this? Where traditional marketing focuses on satisfying external customers, internal marketing focuses on keeping internal customers — that is, the employees — happy.

The Covid-19 pandemic and lockdown have created significant challenges for the higher education sector, and our universities and colleges are working hard on strategies and solutions to achieve the end goal of catching up and completing the 2020 academic year.

Nelson Mandela University’s conundrum – online teaching when 35% of students don’t have digital access.

We need to mask up and ramp up local solutions to break the Covid-19 transmission chain in our diverse urban, township, informal settlement and rural communities.

The Covid-19 pandemic has shown the need for South Africa to manufacture life-saving drugs.